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‘Start Here’: High winds fuel California fires, House to vote on impeachment inquiry


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‘Start Here’: High winds fuel California fires, House to vote on impeachment inquiry

It’s Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. Let’s start here. Interested in Start Here Morning Briefing ? Add Start Here Morning Briefing as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Start Here Morning Briefing news, video, and analysis from ABC News. 1. Wind and fire California firefighters continue to battle historic hurricane-force winds and…

‘Start Here’: High winds fuel California fires, House to vote on impeachment inquiry

It’s Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019. Let’s start here.

Interested in Start Here Morning Briefing ?

Add Start Here Morning Briefing as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Start Here Morning Briefing news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

1. Wind and fire

California firefighters continue to battle historic hurricane-force winds and wildfires as thousands have been forced to evacuate their homes.

ABC News Chief National Correspondent Matt Gutman joins «Start Here» from the fireline in Simi Valley, where he says, «I have never seen wind like we saw yesterday and I’ve never seen a fire move that fast.»

2. Impeachment next steps

The House is set to vote today on a resolution laying out the process for the public phase of the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

Despite the vote focusing on procedures for public hearings, ABC News’ Trish Turner, who covers Capitol Hill, says it’s also a gauge of where lawmakers stand on impeachment: «You can bet political ads will be cut off of this vote.»

PHOTO: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi talks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 30, 2019.Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi talks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Oct. 30, 2019.

3. Political ads blocked

«We believe political message reach should be earned, not bought,» Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey tweeted on Wednesday, announcing that the platform will no longer allow paid political advertising beginning in November.

A political message earns reach when people decide to follow an account or retweet. Paying for reach removes that decision, forcing highly optimized and targeted political messages on people. We believe this decision should not be compromised by money.

— jack 🌍🌏🌎 (@jack) October 30, 2019

The move comes as tech companies have come under scrutiny for their handling of misinformation, and could put pressure on Facebook and other social media sites to do the same, according to Digital Trends’ Mat Katz on «Start Here.»

PHOTO: In this Sept. 5, 2018, file photo Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms on Capitol Hill in Washington.Jose Luis Magana/AP
In this Sept. 5, 2018, file photo Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on «Foreign Influence Operations and Their Use of Social Media Platforms» on Capitol Hill in Washington.

«Start Here,» ABC News’ flagship podcast, offers a straightforward look at the day’s top stories in 20 minutes. Listen for free every weekday on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn or the ABC News app. Follow @StartHereABC on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for exclusive content and show updates.

Elsewhere:

‘We wish him well’: Tim Morrison, the senior director for Europe and Russia on the White House National Security Council, is scheduled to testify before impeachment investigators on Capitol Hill Thursday and is expected to leave his White House post soon, two sources tell ABC News.

‘There’s one issue, however’: After ten days on the picket line, the Chicago Teachers Union has voted to accept a tentative deal with the city — but an addition point of contention means that teachers in the Windy City still won’t be returning to work Thursday.

‘Reason for deep concern’: A national academic achievement test released on Wednesday showed that average reading scores for fourth and eighth graders declined from 2017 to 2019.

From our friends at FiveThirtyEight:

Real Life. Real News. Real Voices

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The FiveThirtyEight staff dedicates its weekly politics chat to the question of what will change when impeachment goes public?

Doff your cap:

Everyone has an opinion about the best Halloween costume. Star Wars? Stranger Things? There are a million to choose from. But this one gets our vote: It’s a life-size arcade claw machine.

VIDEO: This claw-machine costume just won Halloween ABCNews.com
VIDEO: This claw-machine costume just won Halloween

The costume was the brainchild of Philadelphia mom Andrea Hamburg, who came up with the novel idea after a trip to the arcade with her twin girls. Enjoy your Halloween, everyone!

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